An endangered population and roadside mortality: three western Yellow-breasted Chat fatalities in the south Okanagan valley, British Columbia

Annette J. Potvin and Christine A. Bishop1


1Environment Canada, 5421 Robertson Rd., Delta, B.C. V4K 2N2; e-mail: cab.bishop@ec.gc.ca: Corresponding Author


Abstract: During 2001-2008, three western Yellow-breasted Chats (Icteria virens auricollis) were found dead along roadsides in the south Okanagan valley, British Columbia. It is suspected that these were casualties of vehicular impacts but other causes of death cannot be ruled out. All were found within relatively close proximity to riparian habitat and in two cases within 50 m of known breeding territories. Two of the specimens were banded, one of which was found 15 km south of its banding location. Blood was observed on the mouth lining of one specimen and a broken tibiotarsus was detected in another specimen. No obvious trauma was noted on the third specimen. Despite the skulking nature of this species and their tendency to remain in thickets, this identifies roads as a potential threat to Yellow-breasted Chats.

Key words: Yellow-breasted Chat, Icteria virens auricollis, roadkill, habitat fragmentation, mortality, dispersal, Okanagan valley, British Columbia


PDFicon Potvin, A.J. and C.A. Bishop. 2010. An endangered population and roadside mortality: three western Yellow-breasted Chat fatalities in the south Okanagan valley, British Columbia. British Columbia Birds 20:45-48.

 


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